Phylogenetic Comparative Methods

Dublin Core

Description

Evolution is happening all around us. In many cases – lately, due to technological advances in molecular biology – scientists can now describe the evolutionary
process in exquisite detail. For example, we know exactly which genes change in frequency from one generation to the next as mice and lizards evolve a white color to match the pale sands of their novel habitats (Rosenblum et al. 2010). We understand the genetics, development, and biomechanical processes that link changes in a Galapagos finches’ diet to the shape of their bill (Abzhanov et al. 2004). And, in some cases, we can watch as one species splits to become two
(for example, Rolshausen et al. 2009).
Detailed studies of evolution over short time-scales have been incredibly fruitful and important for our understanding of biology. But evolutionary biologists have always wanted more than this. Evolution strikes a chord in society because it aims to tell us how we, along with all the other living things that we know about, came to be.

Creator

Luke J. Harmon

Source

https://lukejharmon.github.io/pcm/pdf/phylogeneticComparativeMethods.pdf

Publisher

Independent

Date

2019

Contributor

Baihaqi

Rights

Creative Commons

Format

PDF

Language

English

Type

Files

phylogeneticComparativeMethods.pdf

Collection

Citation

Luke J. Harmon , “Phylogenetic Comparative Methods,” Open Educational Resource (OER) , accessed October 26, 2020, http://oer.iain-padangsidimpuan.ac.id/items/show/2677.

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